Jan
06

An Editorial Milestone & Epiphany

January 6, marked not only Epiphany Day, but also the passage past the half way point of the first year of  Military Success Network. The site is dedicated to bringing to light the stories and resources that support resilient transition from military to civilian life and work.

This significant public day is celebrated in its religious context in specific ways in the USA and in cultures all over the world.

Interestingly, the secular meaning of epiphany, also marks the movement from one state of knowing and experience to another. It involves light, search and hopefully, celebration in what is found.

It denotes the power of change. [Read more…]

Dec
18

Brutal and bloody Battle of Verdun remembered

Battle of Verdun 1916 French Regiment

Verdun 1916 French 87th Regiment Cote 34

On the 18th December 1916, one of the most deadly battles of World War I ended without a clear victor. The carnage was mind numbing with casualties estimated at more than 700,000 to just under one million. The battle pitted the French against the Germans and it was one of the many attempts to break the grueling trench warfare.

The city of Verdun was destined to be the scene of many clashes. [Read more…]

Dec
10

64th International Human Rights Day

December 10 is ‘International Human Rights Day’. In 2012, this set annual date marks the 64th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Eleanor_Roosevelt_holding up the Human_Rights_Declaration

Eleanor Roosevelt holds Human Rights Declaration in English

The day is about the United Nations General Assembly’s adoption and proclamation, on 10 December 1948, of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). It became one of the first major achievements of the new United Nations and it was the first global enunciation of human rights. [Read more…]

Oct
18

Mason-Dixon line drawn 245 years ago

On this day, 245 years ago, the famous Mason-Dixon Line was drawn. Two English surveyors, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon completed a land survey meant to end the border dispute between Pennsylvania and Maryland.

Mason Dixon Line crown stone

A “crownstone” boundary monument on the Mason-Dixon Line. These markers were originally placed at every 5th mile along the line, oriented with family coats of arms facing the state that they represented. The coat of arms of Maryland’s founding Calvert family is shown. On the other side are the arms of William Penn.(Wikipedia photo and detail)

Initially destined to settle a local dispute, the line grew into a more ominous demarcation between the pro-slavery and the ‘free’ states. The line follows the northern latitude of 39 degrees and 43 minutes and today separates four U.S. states: Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia and Delaware.

Mason and Dixon marked every mile of the chart with stones shipped from England. Every five miles the line was marked with a ‘Crown-stone.’ It consisted of the two coats of arms belonging to the adjacent colonies. Many markers survived and they can still be admired. [Read more…]

Oct
04

Sputnik 1 arrives first in space 55 years ago

Sputnik 1 remembered On Military Success Network

Sputnik 1 Photo via http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov

It was 55 years ago today, October 4, 1957, that the last frontier for humanity was breached. Sputnik 1, the first man-made object in space, was launched in a surprise move by the Soviet Union, much to the shock of America, held at that time to be more advanced in the space race.

Five days earlier, the Soviet Union experienced a radiation contamination accident (from a nuclear fuel plant) known as Kyshtym disaster. The Russians had to evacuate thousands of people, but they kept the reason for that action a secret for 20 years.

Sputnik on the other hand was truly a remarkable achievement. Although the USA launched its own satellite, Explorer 1, less than 4 months later, the cherished first spot was lost forever.
[Read more…]

Sep
26

Military Police Corps Regiment Celebrates 71!

While the Military Police Corps achieved permanent status in the U.S. Army on September 26, 1941, its traditions of duty, service, and security date back to the Revolutionary War.

[Read more…]

Sep
19

Women activists secured inclusive democracy

Since the time of primitive tribal societies – where everybody’s voice was more or less equal (determined in part, I suppose by seniority or the size of one’s club) – to modern and all inclusive democracies, man has struggled to find the ideal form of government.

The ancient Athenians made early inroads with a system that recognized the right to vote. It applied to all male citizens, 20 years of age or older. Women, immigrants and slaves didn’t count. [Read more…]

Sep
11

Remembering 9/11 and counting on each other

Today is 11 years since the dates 9/11 became forever a part of our collective memories, world-wide, and we remember.

Innocents who had not officially enlisted that day to be warriors lost lives and affected countless others lives in our communities. We also remember those who rushed in selflessly to help, to try to save lives.

Military Success Network respectfully remembers.

Simulation in training of journalists covering conflict zones

We’re also remembering those who answer the call of duty to capture history, journalists who help us make sense of the world around us. If the life saving skills of any one of the  brave police, fireman or other heroes who rushed to help in 9/11 were present in peers at a conflict zone, it is likely that some might not succumb to  wounds and die.

[Read more…]

Sep
03

A Republic State of Mind in San Marino

Coat_of_arms_of_San_Marino

San Marino Coat of Arms with the single word motto: Freedom

As proud as we are of our ‘republican’ constitution in the United States of America, there is a nation out there that has been a republic well before us and has an older constitution. Abraham Lincoln was its honorary citizen. It might be hard to find it on the map even if you know where to look. But it is there. And it’s been there for the last 17 centuries. [Read more…]

Aug
25

“Nothing Great Is Easy”

Have you ever wondered when the first swim across the English Channel was?

Captain Matthew Webb swam the English Channel on August 25, 1875

On August 25, 1875 an Englishman did it. It took Matthew Webb, an officer in the British merchant marine, 22 hours to swim from Dover to Calais.

Webb’s feat of courage and endurance has since been repeated by many hundreds. Nonetheless, today’s swimmers wear high tech neoprene suits that allow them to withstand the cold waters of the channel.

[Read more…]